SIMPLICITY IN DESIGN


IN SIMPLICITY WE FIND THE BEAUTY, BECAUSE THE EYE CAN REST! WHEN THE EYE IS ABLE TO REST, THE SOUL CAN REST!

KRIS SCHIRMER
2009/10/14





7/25/11

DESIGNER OF THE MOST FAMOUS LOGOS



PAUL RAND

(born Peretz Rosenbaum, (August 15, 1914 — November 26, 1996) was an American graphic designer, best known for his corporate logo designs.
Paul Rand may not be a familiar name or face to many, but he created the public face of many of the world’s most well-known companies. ABC Television, IBM, UPS and NeXT are a few of the many companies that Rand designed a logo for.
While Rand didn’t design the current Apple logo (which is a derivative of the multicolored Apple logo designed by Rob Janoff), his work is well respected in Apple circles. When Apple launched its “Think Different” campaign     , it chose to feature Paul Rand on a print ad.




 He was one of the originators of the Swiss Style of graphic design.

Among these young Americans it seems to be that Paul Rand is one of the best and most capable [. . .] He is a painter, lecturer, industrial designer, [and] advertising artist who draws his knowledge and creativeness from the resources of this country. He is an idealist and a realist, using the language of the poet and business man. He thinks in terms of need and function. He is able to analyze his problems but his fantasy is boundless. 





Video, Editing, Motion Graphics and Music by Sarah Brody
Switzerland, 1994




Paul Rand from Sarah Brody on Vimeo.

Steve Jobs once called Paul Rand, “the greatest living graphic designer.” Though no longer alive, Rand’s legend still thrives in his work and in his writings. With a body of work that includes logos for 


IBM,

   Westinghouse,   ABC   UPS, and  NeXT, he’s still someone you should listen to.




In Design, Form, and Chaos, Rand shares “some thoughts and despair about the design of a logo.”
First what is a logo? Rand says poetically:

A logo is a flag, a signature, an escutcheon, a street sign. 
A logo does not sell (directly), it identifies.
A logo is rarely a description of a business.
A logo derives meaning from the quality of the thing it symbolizes,
         not the other way around. A logo is less important than the product it signifies; what it represents is more
         important than what it looks like.
The subject matter of a logo can be almost anything.

HIS HISTORICAL Timeline IS TO BE FOUND OVER HERE.

If you are interested how logos changed their "face" over time GO HERE!

ONE BOOK I WANT TO RECOMMEND:

Paul Rand: Conversations with Students


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I WISH YOU ALL A GREAT TIME ON THE PATH OF SIMPLIFYING LIFE - YOURS AS WELL AS OTHERS!

LOVE KRIS


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